Kentucky’s “Intellectual Freedom” Bill

Republican Representative Tim Moore has introduced a new bill in the Kentucky House of Representatives that would let teachers promote “objective discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of scientific theories” and “use, as permitted by the local board of education, materials in addition to state-approved texts and instructional materials for discussion of scientific theories.” Of course, the bill claims not to be promoting any religious doctrine—though, to many, the “Kentucky Science Education and Intellectual Freedom Act,” like other “academic freedom” bills, is a stealth attempt to sneak religious ideas like “intelligent design” into the science classroom.

Last February, Moore introduced a similar bill that would have allowed teachers to “use, as permitted by the local board of education, materials in addition to state-approved texts and instructional materials for discussion of scientific theories including evolution, the origins of life, global warming, and human cloning.” That bill died in April.

Regular readers of this blog might also remember that Kentucky currently has a statute that allows instructors teaching evolution to “include as a portion of such instruction the theory of creation as presented in the Bible, and may accordingly read such passages in the Bible as are deemed necessary for instruction on the theory of creation, thereby affording students a choice as to which such theory to accept.” The statute also says that for students “who accept the Bible theory of creation, credit shall be permitted on any examination in which adherence to such theory is propounded, provided the response is correct according to the instruction received.”

Category: Science Education

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One Response

  1. Lotfinia says:

    While cringing with thoughts of international horror over this, I actually find a glimmer of hope for science in it. An objective discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of scientific theories could be a great thing. First off, it might educate more people as to what a theory really is. Second, someone might actually realize sciences’ claim to have discredited the Bible is wrong; it has discredited the chronology, not the Bible itself. Once this becomes established fact, as it will be…the battle between science and religion becomes a real battle based upon fact, not desires of the two sides.

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