Does Nonverbal TV Behavior Transmit Racial Bias?

In Scientific American Mind, Valerie Ross looks at the findings of a recent study in which researchers at Tufts University showed people mixed-race scenes from popular TV shows with the sound cut out:

After watching clips in which black characters were treated less favorably than whites, the viewers’ conscious attitudes about race did not change. But they were faster to associate white people with positive words such as “laughter” and black people with negative words such as “failure”—a sign that this implicit bias had found its way from the TV screen into people’s behavior, the researchers say. After watching clips in which black characters were treated better than whites, however, viewers not only displayed less implicit bias toward blacks, they also showed improved conscious attitudes toward blacks as measured by a questionnaire.

Category: Observations

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One Response

  1. tom says:

    It’s the same with fat people. Look in children moovie as Walt Disney, as Aladin, , the fat is always dumb or nasty, and associated with disgust.

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